GLOBAL WATER
Completed Projects

Global Water’s Rural Outreach Water Supply Program is a significant departure from typical humanitarian projects in developing countries. However, over the years Global Water has worked on numerous water supply projects around the world in a variety of capacities. Here is a partial list of Global Water’s past projects:

Global Water Projects Guatemala Honduras Brazil Liberia Togo, Africa Nicaragua, Central America South Africa Zimbabwe Zaire Sudan Kenya Somalia Romania Laos
Put your mouse over a square to see the country name and click for more description on the Global Water projects in that country.

Brazil - Guatemala - Honduras - Kenya - Laos - Liberia - Nicaragua - Romania
Somalia - South Africa - Sudan - Togo - Zaire - Zimbabwe



BRAZIL

In collaboration with another international humanitarian organization and two private groups, Global Water has provided equipment recommendations and technical expertise for agricultural and health supporting water programs in Brazil.

 

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GUATAMALA

In recent years, Global Water has funded multiple projects each year in Guatemala. 

These completed projects include the following –

Healthy Schools Program
This is a wonderful program in Guatemala run by the Appropriate Technology Program in the Peace Corps. During a Healthy Schools project, an “Appropriate Technology” Peace Corps volunteer works with a group of schools to help them build health-related facilities. These facilities include: water systems, latrines, kitchen facilities, and hand-washing stations (called lavamanos).

Once the necessary health-related facilities are installed and being used, the schools become eligible to be recognized as a “healthy school” by the Guatemalan government agency that builds and maintains schools. (hence, the Program’s name). The final activity that must be accomplished by the school is implementing an educational program to teach students how and why to use hygiene-related facilities.

As you can probably imagine, it’s quite an accomplishment for a school to be recognized by the Guatemalan Education Agency and so having a “healthy school” in a village is a significant point of pride for the village, as well as the students and teachers of the school.

Global Water funds a variety of projects within the Healthy Schools Program each year throughout Guatemala in partnership with the Peace Corps and local NGOs. Progress Reports from this program can be found under Progress Reports on the Global Water website.

The Panimachavac Project was a gravity-flow water supply and distribution system for the rural village of Panimachavac, located in the Department of Chimaltenago, Guatemala. There are 43 families living in the village with a total population of about 190 people.

The system included a spring capture box, break pressure tanks, a 10 cubic meter (2,600 gallons) storage / distribution tank located just above the village and a main gravity-flow transport line measuring four kilometers (2.5 miles).  An additional piping system distributed water from the storage tank to household faucets installed at each individual home site.

The Caton Vi’qola  Project was a gravity-flow water supply and distribution system for the rural village of Caton Vi’qola, in the Department of El Quiche, Guatemala and located about nine kilometers (5.5 miles) northeast of the city of Nebaj in the Cuchumantane Mountains of the Guatemalan Central Highlands.

There are 22 families living in the village with a total population of about 110 people. The system included a spring capture box, break pressure tanks, a 5 cubic meter (1,300 gallons) storage / distribution tank located just above the village and a main gravity-flow transport line measuring 1.6 kilometers (1 mile).  An additional piping system distributed water from the storage tank to household faucets installed at each individual home site.

The San Francisco Javier Project was a gravity-flow water supply and distribution system for the rural village of San Francisco Javier, located in the Department of El Quiche, Guatemala.  The village is located 30 kilometers northwest of Nebaj, in the Cuchumantane Mountains of the Guatemalan Central Highlands.

There are 60 families living in the village with a total population of about 300 people. The system included a spring capture box, break pressure tanks, two 5 cubic meter (each 1,300 gallonsl) storage / distribution tank located just above the village and a main gravity-flow transport line measuring four kilometers (2.5 miles).  An additional piping system distributed water from the storage tank to household faucets installed at each individual home site.

The Tisumal Project was a gravity-flow water supply and distribution system for the rural village of Tisumal, in the Department of El Quiche, Guatemala and located about 46 kilometers (28 miles) north of the city of Nebaj in the Cuchumantane Mountains of the Guatemalan Central Highlands.

There are 28 families living in the village with a total population of about 140 people.
The system included a spring capture box, break pressure tanks, a 5 cubic meter (1,300 gallons) storage / distribution tank located just above the village and a main gravity-flow transport line.  An additional piping system distributed water from the storage tank to household faucets installed at each individual home site.

The Cotzol Project was a gravity-flow water supply and distribution system for the rural village of Cotzol, in the Department of El Quiche, Guatemala and located about 46 kilometers (28 miles) north of the city of Nebaj in the Cuchumantane Mountains of the Guatemalan Central Highlands.

There are 92 families living in the village with a total population of about 496 people.
The system included a spring capture box, break pressure tanks, a 5 cubic meter (1,300 gallons) storage / distribution tank located just above the village and a main gravity-flow transport line measuring 8 kilometers (5 miles).  An additional piping system distributed water from the storage tank to faucets installed at 27 home sites that were centrally located throughout the village area.

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HONDURAS

In recent years, Global Water has contributed to one project in Honduras in support of rural villagers.  We provided partial funding for a five water well drilling project carried out by a Honduran NGO near La Esperanza, in the State of Intubuca, Honduras.  All of the wells were completed with hand pumps and each well was basically associated with a village consisting of 15 to 25 adobe hut home sites with a total of up to 150 people per village. Global Water helped fund the drilling of two of these wells.

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KENYA

Global Water provided a W.A.T.E.R. Team hydrologist to provide well drilling expertise and other on-site technical assistance. This was a "self-help" project co-sponsored by Amesbury for Africa to develop income generating agricultural activities in rural villages in Kenya.

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LAOS

Global Water provided another humanitarian organization with assistance in locating and purchasing appropriate well drilling equipment for water supply projects in Laos. The recommended equipment was a fully reconditioned well drilling rig from a U. S. manufacturer at a fraction of the cost of new comparable equipment.

 

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LIBERIA

Global Water has provided well drilling and water purification equipment recommendations to a native Liberian who was in the U. S. as a political refugee. He has since returned to Liberia to continue his lifelong work to develop agricultural water wells in his native land.

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NICARAGUA

In recent years, Global Water has funded multiple projects each year in Nicargua.  These completed projects include the following –

The Masiguito Project was a gravity-flow water supply and distribution system for the rural village of Masiguito in the municipality of Camoapa in the department of Boaco in Nicaragua and located northeast of the city of Mangua.   From Managua it was approximately a 3 hour drive to the municipality of Camoapa and another hour (28 kilometers) up a mountainous rural road, to the village of Masiguito.  There are about 92 families living in the area without a consistent water source.  The system included a spring capture box, break pressure tanks, a storage / distribution tank located just above the village and a gravity-flow transport line totaling 2.2 kilometers (1.4 miles) including both main line from the spring to the distribution tank and distribution piping.  The distribution piping system connected the storage tank to several centralized faucets installed throughout the village area; centralized faucet locations were chosen because the village home sites were too spread out to accommodate household faucets.

The La Pita Project was a gravity-flow water supply and distribution system for the rural village of La Pita in the municipality of Terrabona in the department of Matagalpa, Nicaragua.  The village is located about 25 kilometers (16 miles) east of the city of Terrabona.  From Managua it was approximately a 2 hour drive to the municipality of Terrabona and another hour (25 kilometers) over a mountainous rural road to the village of La Pita.  There are 39 families living in the village with a total population of about 244 people.

The system included a spring capture box, break pressure tanks, a storage / distribution tank located just above the village and a gravity-flow transport line totaling 2.9 kilometers (1.8 miles) including both main line from the spring to the distribution tank and distribution piping.  In addition, faucets were installed at the local village school and church.  

Nicaragua

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ROMANIA

Global Water was contacted by American visitors to a children's orphanage in Romania through the Global Water Web Site. The orphanage was in desperate need of a water well that could provide safe water for its children, and an associated dairy farm. Global Water initiated and coordinated a survey that was performed by a local water well driller in preparation for well drilling activities. Funding for this project was not readily available so incredibly the American visitors that identified the original water problem actually provided the funding for a well to be drilled. The well has since been drilled and is providing a clean source of water to the orphanage for the first time in many many years. This project is an excellent example of what is possible when concerned people take it upon themselves to help correct an identified water related problem.

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SOMALIA

In collaboration with another international humanitarian organization and a local Somalia entrepreneur, Global Water provided a W.A.T.E.R. Team advisor to operate well drilling equipment already on-site and to train local Somalian operators.

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SOUTH AFRICA

At the request of the Water and Sanitation for Health (WASH) Program affiliated with the U. S. Agency for International Development (AID), Global Water provided a W.A.T.E.R. Team advisor to head a survey team to analyze and recommend solutions to water problems in the northern portion of South Africa. Global Water's technical representative then supervised the reconstruction of many bore-holes (shallow wells) into deeper developed wells with on site equipment.

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SUDAN

In response to a request by another international humanitarian organization, Global Water provided support for a major water supply development project in the Sudan. Global Water made equipment recommendations and agreed to provide an on-site W.A.T.E.R. Team to operate equipment and train local operators.

 

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TOGO, AFRICA

The Togo Project consisted of repairing water well hand pumps in the northern region of Togo near the city of Kara.  The pumps had broken for a variety of reasons and approximately 800 people use the wells associated with the hand pumps.  Most of the pumps in this region are the “India Mk II” type.

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ZAIRE

Global Water supported a water development project designed to drill multiple water wells throughout Zaire. Global Water coordinated the donation of well drilling equipment, training, and transportation, as well as a W.A.T.E.R. Team advisor to provide technical assistance to Zairian workers on-site

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ZIMBABWE

In collaboration with Africare, Global Water provided assistance to support an extensive health and agricultural water development program for the drought plagued central portion of Zimbabwe.

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